Snap Ads Max Reach is Snapchat’s version of the home page takeover

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For one day, advertisers can get their vertical video ads seen by all US viewers of Snapchat’s various Stories formats.

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Snapchat has quietly been pitching advertisers on a way to reach everyone in the US who views a Story on a given day.

Earlier this year, Snap Inc.’s Snapchat added a new ad-buying option that equates to the mobile app’s version of a traditional website’s home page takeover, a Snap spokesperson confirmed on Tuesday.

Called Snap Ads Max Reach, the option is similar to Instagram’s Marquee and Twitter’s First View takeover options. Snapchat’s version guarantees that a brand’s ad will be served to everyone in the US who is shown a Snap Ad on a given day. In other words, anyone who watches a friend’s or celebrity’s Story, views one of Snapchat’s curated Our Stories or checks out a publisher’s Discover channel (also known as a “Publisher Story”) will see the brand’s ad the first time Snapchat attaches an ad to one of those Stories.

For now, Snap Ads Max Reach campaigns are only available in the US and can only be bought directly through Snapchat’s sales team.

The addition of Snap Ads Max Reach means Snapchat has takeover-style options for each of its three ad formats. Snapchat’s Sponsored Geofilters can be run nationally, and Sponsored Lenses can only be run nationally.

For those curious about the three formats and their various features, here’s an interactive guide that breaks down the details:


About The Author

Tim Peterson, Third Door Media’s Social Media Reporter, has been covering the digital marketing industry since 2011. He has reported for Advertising Age, Adweek and Direct Marketing News. A born-and-raised Angeleno who graduated from New York University, he currently lives in Los Angeles. He has broken stories on Snapchat’s ad plans, Hulu founding CEO Jason Kilar’s attempt to take on YouTube and the assemblage of Amazon’s ad-tech stack; analyzed YouTube’s programming strategy, Facebook’s ad-tech ambitions and ad blocking’s rise; and documented digital video’s biggest annual event VidCon, BuzzFeed’s branded video production process and Snapchat Discover’s ad load six months after launch. He has also developed tools to monitor brands’ early adoption of live-streaming apps, compare Yahoo’s and Google’s search designs and examine the NFL’s YouTube and Facebook video strategies.


 

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